FCNB Bank converts to state charter

FCNB Bank converts to state charter

FCNB Bank headquartered in Steelville, Missouri recently converted to a state-chartered bank through the Missouri Division of Finance. Celebrating the milestone is the FCNB Board of Directors, from L to R: Randy Bono, Herbert J. Baumann, John W. Perkins, Rosella Roberts, John Hewkin, Paul E. Perkins, Scott Perkins, Julie Settles, James D. Cottrell, Anita Agers-Brooks and Scott Gahr.

The Missouri Division of Finance welcomed First Community National Bank as a State-charted bank effective November 10, 2021. With the conversion from a national charter to a state charter, the name of the bank has officially changed to FCNB Bank with headquarters in Steelville, Missouri.

“As a community bank, FCNB Bank is a family-owned, locally operated, independent organization that strives to provide banking as it should through customer relationships,” commented FCNB Bank’s President & CEO Scott Perkins. “With our conversion to a state-chartered bank, we will substantially benefit from ensured safety and soundness, reduced regulatory costs and the advocacy to provide local lending decisions. It’s an exceptional move for our bank and our customers.”

With regulatory authority now provided by The Missouri Division of Finance, FCNB Bank will partner with experienced examiners that are knowledgeable of local economic conditions and provide a common-sense approach to community banking. As a longstanding member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, deposits will continue to be insured up to $250,000 per customer.

Originally established as the Bank of Leasburg on March 16, 1906, FCNB Bank has been family-owned and operated by the Perkins family of Steelville since 1961. Under the current leadership of Chairman of the Board Paul E. Perkins, President & CEO Scott Perkins and FCNB Insurance and Investments President Julie Perkins Settles, FCNB Bank remains a strong and progressive independent community bank with $159 million in assets serving the communities of Steelville, Cuba, Sullivan, Rolla and Eureka with six branch and ATM locations.


Relationships Rule

By Scott Perkins, FCNB President & CEO

business Photo of Scott Perkins

When asked to identify the quintessential ingredient that makes community banking special, I do not hesitate to answer “relationships.” And it has never been more apparent then over the past few months when I reached out to the community during the coronavirus pandemic, communicating that the bank was open for business and ready to serve in an hour of need.

It is what we have always done at First Community National Bank. Our focus remains exclusively on delivering exceptional customer care, while our local roots and accountability ensure our interests remain tied to our neighbors here in mid-Missouri.

At FCNB, we work with our customers to help them realize their financial dreams, whether opening a business, purchasing a home, or planning for retirement. And we nurture our community by donating time and money to important causes and contributing tax dollars that help maintain local municipalities—all of which helps keep local neighborhoods viable and vibrant.

We work hard to stay attuned to the needs of this community and relevant to our customers by remaining on their corner and in their corner. This dedication to creating healthy, strong communities has helped the community banking industry flourish and maintained our well-earned reputation as true relationship lenders. Here are the facts:

  • Community banks are economic first responders, processing more than 57 percent or 2.8 million loans as part of the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program, saving an estimated 33.7 million jobs.
  • Community banks are committed to local lending with loan growth that has outpaced noncommunity banks for eight years. Community banks make more than 60 percent of all small business loans under $1 million.
  • Community banks are preferred small business lenders, with a 74 percent net satisfaction score, compared with 60 percent for large banks and 25 percent for online lenders according to a Federal Reserve study.
  • Community banks have consistently demonstrated their safety and soundness with higher capital ratios and better loan quality than the largest financial institutions.
  • Community banks offer high-tech, high-touch service, giving consumers access to modern-day conveniences while maintaining superior customer service for which community banks are known.
  • Community banks operate in areas abandoned by others—serving as the only physical banking presence in nearly one in three U.S. counties.

But it is not just about stats. When customers contact FCNB, they are greeted by a talented team member who is attuned to their needs and empowered to act on their behalf.

And when our employees log volunteer hours in support of the area organizations or when they coach a little league team, we are working toward our goal to ensure economic prosperity for the community we call home.

In an era where bigger is not always better, high-tech does not necessarily equate to high touch, and what we think of as “normal” is in flux we at FCNB pledge to never lose sight of the all-important “relationship” and the personalized service our customers expect. It has been integral to our success for 115 years and is how we will continue to build a legacy that endures